Aquaponics kit turns fish waste into food for you

By on Aug 02, 2012

This unique aquaponics system was designed as an indoor therapeutic garden utilizing the fish waste as plant food to grow vegetables. Shown off at a tradeshow in Japan, this aquaponic system takes advantage of the symbiotic relationship of plants and wastewater as the biological process of the fish waste breaking down provides nourishment for the plants. In turn, the fish get clean water.Click through for a video of the aquaponic system in action.

While aquaponics is nothing new, we covered a similar concept a few years back with the Inka Sun Curve that was more of an outdoor garden but operates on the same principles, this is one of the few we’ve seen that have been created to look more like a traditional aquarium system with a compact design. Because the effluent from the aquarium is consumed by the plants, the tank water doesn’t require changing as often and the cultivated vegetables can be eaten.

The original story had quotes from an unnamed source regarding the system:

“In this system, the fish droppings are decomposed by bacteria, so they become organic fertilizer for the plants. Aquaponics isn’t yet widely known in Japan. So we’ve designed this product to introduce aquaponics in the form of a display. We hope that, if people understand the concept, aquaponics will become widespread.”

“As an interior display, we think this system’s initial benefit is therapeutic. So we’ve created a soothing image by using curves, and we’ve eliminated the corners for safety. This display is also well-lit, so the plants grow well, and the fish look pretty.”

“Currently, we’re using lettuce, but flowers can also be grown. We expect this system will be used in cafes that feature organic vegetables or relaxing themes, and in nursing homes, hospitals, and the like. If people who can’t get outside easily can plant vegetables indoors, we think it could be therapeutic.”

This particular system will cost around $3,800 USD (around 300,000 Yen).

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[via Gizmodo, DigInfoTV]

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