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The Many Faces of Mimicry in Marine Fish

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  1. Grant says:

    Awesome fishes here but the mimic octopus could give them a good run for their money ;D

  2. Jeff Kurtz says:

    No question, Grant! Great point! In fact, we may have to dedicate a future post to the mimic octopus–truly an unparalleled master of disguise.

  3. Kevin says:

    Blennies are cuties even when they’re trying to take a piece out of your finger it seems.

    A bit off topic, but what are the small green orbs growing about the rock in the last pic? Some sort of sponge maybe? I’d much like my rock to sprout some of those, they’re quite neat.

  4. Chris Aldrich says:

    Indeed, Grant! If you’re an octopus fan, you’ll get a kick out of this post: http://bit.ly/1bM01O0

  5. Jeff Kurtz says:

    Hi Kevin! Chris and I are fairly certain those orbs are a type of tunicate (sea squirt), possibly Atriolum robustum or a similar species. Unfortunately, aquariums usually don’t provide adequate quantities of the miniscule planktonic food items these filter feeders require, so most starve to death in captivity.

  6. Paul Baldassano says:

    I recently went on trip to Hawaii, specifically Lanai, Kawii and Maui. The visibility there underwater is not very good at all but I took quite a few pictures underwater. Sole’s are fairly common as are frogfish but almost impossible to see even when someone points one out and practically puts their finger right on the fish as they blend in so well. Lizzardfish are also common and just as hard to see except that they hang out on the sand so that may give away their position. Small rays partially bury themselves in the sand and you only see them when they move. Oddly enough some very large sea urchins are bright red, I can’t figure out why they evolved that particular color as they are found in very shallow water and real easy to see. But the fish that spent their time at the surface like needlefish are bright silver and can’t be seen from below by potential predators.

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